Icaros

Native American Church Ceremonial Artwork & Medicinal Traditions

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Scarlet Macaw feather decorated with Peyote stitch beadwork and feather details

Scarlet Macaw feather decorated with Peyote stitch beadwork and feather details

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A custom order made using an Argus feather. The Argus pheasant is native to Indonesia, yet it’s name is a Greek word which means ‘many eyes’, as can be seen in the feather. The feather is decorated with traditional style peyote stitch beadwork, feather-work and twisted deerskin tassels. 

Filed under peyote peyote stitch peyote cactus beadwork native native american church feathers feather featherwork argus exotic flytying leather deerskin kauyumari tipi teepee peyote meeting nac pow wow peyote fan huichol wirikuta

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This is a custom order fan made with Snowy Owl feathers native to the UK. The feathers are set stiff in this fan and include peyote stitch beadwork, feather-work, twisted deer skin tassels and small feather details. The beadwork design features a green frog and 4 red dots on the back, representing the Kambo medicine. The feathers used were shed from owls in a bird sanctuary. 

Filed under peyote fan peyote stitch feathers beadwork snowy owl leather deerskin native american church nac pow wow kambo frog medicine green light nizhoni peyote kauyumari huichol wirikuta

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NEW: This 9 tail peyote fan is made with tail feathers from the male Red Tailed Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii), native to Australia. This is a loose flat fan, where the tails are loosely attached to the holder part of the fan, rather than fixed. The tails are then strung together so that the fan can be used open, or closed for storage when not in use. These type of fans are commonly used by men and are for cleansing. The handle on this fan is made using size 15 Japanese miyuki seed beads and features a brass adapter so that the handle can be removed when not in use. Includes twisted deer skin tassels, beaded detail and featherwork. 

The feathers used in this fan were lawfully sourced from Australian artist John Gray. John holds a government permit which allows him to collect and distribute cockatoo feathers in his artwork, and as craft supplies to other artists. The feathers he uses are ‘moults’ which are collected after the bird naturally sheds its feathers, and so no bird is harmed.
This fan was custom made for a client from California and so is not for sale.

NEW: This 9 tail peyote fan is made with tail feathers from the male Red Tailed Black Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus banksii), native to Australia. This is a loose flat fan, where the tails are loosely attached to the holder part of the fan, rather than fixed. The tails are then strung together so that the fan can be used open, or closed for storage when not in use. These type of fans are commonly used by men and are for cleansing. The handle on this fan is made using size 15 Japanese miyuki seed beads and features a brass adapter so that the handle can be removed when not in use. Includes twisted deer skin tassels, beaded detail and featherwork. 

The feathers used in this fan were lawfully sourced from Australian artist John Gray. John holds a government permit which allows him to collect and distribute cockatoo feathers in his artwork, and as craft supplies to other artists. The feathers he uses are ‘moults’ which are collected after the bird naturally sheds its feathers, and so no bird is harmed.

This fan was custom made for a client from California and so is not for sale.

(Source: icaros-art)

Filed under cockatoo tails feathers flat loose banksii banksian red tail black cockatoo cleansing fan miyuki brass screw handle deerskin beadwork featherwork shed moulted

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Kambo frog medicine. An Amazonian healing tradition that uses the ‘poison’ from the Kambo frog. Although the ‘poison’ is used by the frog as a defence, it can have healing effects if worked with in the right way. The frog secretes this ‘poison’ from its back and is then collected by the shaman. The ‘patient’ or the person participating in the ceremony is lightly burned with a hot stick either on the arm (men) or the leg (women) to provide an entrance into the body via the lymphatic system. The burns appear as small dots and the medicine is applied to these areas.

This tradition is used by tribal people in the Amazon to get rid of ‘panema’ or bad luck, to gain strength when hunting and as a medicine to protect against disease. It is not only for people that are sick, but can be used by anyone as it cleanses the body on a cellular level and clears the mind. This tradition is widely recognised and respected by South Americans and it has also recently caught the interest of westerners and big pharmaceutical companies who have seen its success.

Filed under amazonian ceremony cleanse frog healing kambo medicine medicine medicine man poison sickness cellular mind tradition south americans south america tribal panema